Tag Archives: United Nations

World News 25/9/2013

Last updated: 15:35 GMT

UNITED NATIONS: The 68th Session got underway with an address from Barrack Obama which will be further discussed here.

The Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff strong criticised the US and the NSA at the beginning of her address to the UN calling it an “intrusion” and calling it a “breach of international law”.

“The right to security of a country’s citizens can never be insured by violating the fundamental human and civil rights of another country’s…” – Rousseff (03:30)

This session saw the much anticipated first speech by new Iranian President Hassan Rouhani. His tone was not as conciliatory as perhaps was expected however it was not aggressive either. He highlighted that Iran wished to work to create a less militarised, more stable world but also highlighted what he felt were injustices being perpetrated against Iran such has the harsh international trade sanctions. Rouhani argued forcefully against these sanctions, saying that they violated inalienable human rights and caused widespread suffering.

Leaders of India and Pakistan and said to meet sometime today to discuss the situations in Kashmir after fresh protests and instability in the past week. Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh and Pakistan’s Nawaz Sharif will meet while the UN General Assembly is ongoing in New York this week.

PAKISTAN: Yesterday’s 7.8 earthquake centred on southwest Pakistan has killed at least 370 people and created a new island. The army has been sent to the region to assist in rescue efforts.

Image from http://www.express.pk

KENYA: At the beginning of the fourth day of conflict in the capital city of Nairobi there were accusations found on Twitter once again. An account linked to al-Shabab, the militant group responsible for this attack which has left at least 61 people dead, claims that Kenyan security forces used chemical weapons to end the siege and have now collapsed a floor to hide the evidence, killing 137 hostages.

Government spokesman Manoah Esipisu denied this and told the AP that the official civilian death toll remains 61 and that no chemical weapons were used. He confirmed that there was a collapse inside the shopping mall but claimed it was caused by a fire started by the militants, they believe 8 civilian hostages could be under the rubble and possible an unknown number of militants.

MALDIVES: There is global concern as a Maldivian court postpones the presidential election scheduled for September 28.

ZIMBABWE: Over 80 elephants were poisoned with cyanide in Hwange National Park, Zimbabwe’s largest game park. Poachers poisoned the watering hole in order to get easy access to the ivory. Other animals were also killed but the park does not yet have definite numbers.

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Sri Lanka’s Defense Minister claims UN Visit influenced by propaganda

The Sri Lankan defense minister, Gotabhaya Rajapaksa, claimed that the visit of the United Nations human rights chief was influeced by propaganda circulated by the remnants of the Tamil Tigers.

The Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam (LTTE), known frequently as the Tamil Tigers were rebels who fought in nearly 30 years of civil war before being defeated by the government in 2009. Ethnic Tamils claimed they faced, and still face, much discrimination from the Sinhalese ethnic majority. The goal of the Tigers was to create an independent Tamil state. A UN report says that up to 40,000 people were killed in the final days of the conflict.

Navi Pillay, the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, just concluded a week long visit to Sri Lanka which followed a UN Human Rights Council resolution calling on Sri Lanka to investigate civil era war crimes committed by its government forces that passed in March.

High Commissioner for Human Rights Navi Pillay UN Photo/Jean-Marc Ferré
High Commissioner for Human Rights Navi Pillay UN Photo/Jean-Marc Ferré

Pillay expressed concerns about the situation to journalists in the capital, Colombo, on Saturday.

“I am deeply concerned that Sri Lanka, despite the opportunity provided by the end of the war to construct a new vibrant, all-embracing state, is showing signs of heading in an increasingly authoritarian direction…the fighting is over, the suffering is not”.

Pillay reported that some of the activist, journalist or simply ordinary Sri Lankans who tried to meet with er were “harassed by police or military officers“.

“This type of surveillance and harassment appears to be getting worse in Sri Lanka, which is a country where critical voices are quite often attacked or even permanently silenced…the United Nations takes the issues of reprisals against people because they have talked to UN officials as an extremely serious matter.” – Pillay

But Rajapaksa claims that these ideas are created by ex-LTTE propaganda and the Sri Lankan people must choose whether to trust in their government or not rather than being “caricatured by external entities influenced by vested interests.”

Pillay will brief the UN Human Rights Council on her findings next month and a full report is due to be published in March 2014.

Orla-Jo

What We’re Talking About When We’re Talking About Feminism

Feminism is word that simply by existing can cause controversy. It is often implied that feminist issues are frivolous issues, that feminists are petty and mean-spirited or that feminists just care about abortion or sexual harassment. The mainstream media fosters this idea of feminism is narrow, reactionary and unnecessary.

But feminism is more than a narrowly interpreted idea of “women’s issues”.

Education is a feminist issue. Two thirds of the children in the world without access to education are girls.

Trans rights are a feminist issue. When someone is told that their gender identity lessens them as humans or limits their human rights, that is a feminist issue.

Poverty is a feminist issue. Women make up 70% of the world’s poor. Women work two thirds of the world’s working hours but receive only 10% of the world’s income and own less than 1% of the world’s property. Of the 150 major conflicts fought since War War Two, 130 of them were fought in the developing world.

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UN Photo/Martine Perret

Racism is a feminist issue. Stereotypes and discrimination of women of colour is a feminist issue. Native American women are nearly twice as likely to be sexually assaulted. Indigenous women in Canada are five times more likely to die as a result of violence.

The rights of the disabled are feminist issues. In Europe, Australia and North America, over half of disabled women will experience physical abuse.

War and conflict are feminist issues. Of the 27.4 million people displaced due to conflict in 1996; 80% of them were women and children. Wartime rape affects women of all ages. In the Democratic Republic of Congo 36 women are raped every day. During the Bosnian War between 20,000 and 50,000 women were raped.

Clinic Somalia UN
UN Photo/Stuart Price

Rape is held over the heads of women all over the world as a punishment for those who step out of line and is most definitely a feminist issue, even when the victims are men. In the United States someone is sexual assaulted every 2 minutes, 54% of rapes go unreported and 97% of rapists will receive no jail sentence.

Women between the ages of 15 and 44 years of age are globally more at risk from rape and domestic violence than they are from cancer, war, car accidents or malaria according to World Bank data.

There is a sentiment that feminism is unnecessary or that the term is outdated, that there is no need to actively promote the ‘feminine’ but rather support equality as a whole. But the idea that what is traditionally ‘feminine’ is lesser is still so pervasive in today’s culture that while it is socially acceptable for a women to behave and dress in ways considered traditionally masculine, the same cannot be said for men who wish to behave or dress in ways considered to be feminine. These bias are damaging to men as well. But more significantly they demonstrate that many advances that appear to have occurred in gender equality are based on the idea that women should behave or value things that are more traditionally masculine.

That is why feminism remains relevant.

Pibor South Suden UN
UN Photo

Orla-Jo